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An unexpected adventure in Lego: The Hobbit – HITC

Original article

Re-experience Bilbo’s unexpected adventure with the dwarves in attempt to reclaim their homeland from a dragon, In Lego!

Almost 111 years old, Bilbo Baggins to write down the full story of an unexpected journey which took place 60 years in the past. After being tricked by the wizard Gandalf the Grey, Bilbo embarks on a perilous adventure to reclaim the Dwarven kingdom under the mountain  and pull off the greatest heist in middle earth, to steal back the Arkenstone from a powerful dragon, Smaug, who has been dormant for a long time, claiming the role of king under the mountain.

Meanwhile, a sickness falls upon the Elven forest Mirkwood. Dark magic is corrupting the wood and its source is the abandoned fortress of Dol Guldur where a powerful necromancer, Sauron, has been secretly building an army to plunge middle earth into war, chaos and despair. Bilbo discovers a remarkable trinket on his journey; the one ring to rule them all, which grants him the ability to turn invisible. Having no idea of the significance or the origin of this ring, Bilbo pursue’s his heist for his dwarven companions…

The core experiences of both “An Unexpected Journey” and “The Desolation of Smaug” have been recreated with a Lego twist,  like other Lego games the story has been modified to add interesting gameplay whilst retaining the core, linear elements of the Films. Following in the footsteps of its middle-earth predecessor, Lego: Lord of the Rings, the action-adventure blockbuster, block-builder and block smasher returns following the journey of Bilbo Baggins’ past…

The game features a construction system similar to Emmet’s in The Lego Movie Videogame, however you will have to mine for wooden and crystal objects in order to build certain objects. The game also features a large map rather than a single hub and it is completely open world. It also includes 90+ playable characters, even a miniature, fire-breathing version of Smaug.

The Announcement Trailer:[embedded content]

The Buddy Up Trailer: [embedded content]

The Launch Trailer: [embedded content]

The game is available now on all major platforms, if you are a fan of The Hobbit you don’t want to give this one a miss… 

hobbit lego – Google News

Lego The Hobbit – Vector

Original article

Video Games[1] lego the hobbit newspaper cover image

Published on April 26th, 2014 | by Daniel-Peter Adjetey

lego the hobbit review article picture

Release Date: April 8, 2014

Developer: Traveller’s Tales

Publisher: Warner Bros Interactive Entertainment

Systems: Windows, PS3, PS4, Xbox One, Xbox 360, PS Vita, 3DS

Genre: Action-adventure

Another week, another Lego game. After several years of Lego-fied games based on famous movie properties, Traveller’s Tales is back at it again with another romp into the storied Tolkien universe of LOTR with The Hobbit. As a prequel to the famous trilogy, this game and its story is focused mainly on Bilbo Baggins (Frodo’s uncle) and his quest for glory as a thief in the company of a band of dwarves. Based on the second movie (The Desolation of Smaug), this game comes at an odd time. It’s several months after the movie hit theaters and well after the first one hit home video. That said, I still took a look at it and…. let’s just say I’ve not been so disinterested in such a long time.

Make no mistake – for those of you interested in the story (or for those of you who have not read the book or seen the movie) the plot is a relatively good and funny retelling of the first two movies of The Hobbit trilogy. As Bilbo, you venture from the safety of Bag End and into the very depths of Middle Earth in the service of Thorin and his troupe of 12 dwarves. As the team burglar, you journey through spider-infested forests, damp caves, raving rapids and other places from the movies: all of which are trying to kill you in some way. The adventure then leads you towards the den of Smaug, the titular dragon from the second movie and final boss of the game. Eventually, you happen upon the One Ring of Power that leads to some interesting internal conflict between Bilbo and his own inner desires. However, as lofty the stage is for the game, the fact that it focuses on the movie instead of the book leaves a lot of the story up in the air as it ends on the same cliffhanger that the movie did.

Along with the funny dialogue and banter between the game’s characters, the rest of the Lego series game tropes are all here as well. The game is broken into linear levels recreating moments and set pieces from the movies (although, you do travel throughout the world in a somewhat open ended fashion, like the last few Lego games). As you progress through them you collect studs (the games currency) doing anything from beating up enemies, breaking apart scenery, solving puzzles and so on, that you can use to buy secret characters. These are characters that you will need, aside from fan favorites; each character is broken into a certain archetype that can do certain things in each level. For example, certain groups of characters can team up for buddy attacks on bosses.

Character voices are modeled after the stars in the movie and the scenes play out very well for having been constructed via Lego pieces. The scenery looks gorgeous and is a mix of flush nature and Lego pieces that really pop when you run alongside it. However, with all good things there is almost always something glaringly wrong that mares at its perfection; here, it stands out like a sore thumb. There is almost nothing new here for fans or newcomers alike. The puzzles are still a two-fold mechanism: either insultingly easy or maddeningly frustrating. They mostly consist of creating something via pieces scattered around the level, but as some parts might need to be broken out from that one thing in the environment you neglected to hit, it might leave you scratching your head as to why this puzzle isn’t working. Combat is still a button mashing affair, though the actions that play out are well animated. The game is fun for what it is, but it ends on a rather silly cliffhanger and throughout the dozen or so hour campaign it will just hit you that you have been playing a rehash of the last few Lego games (DC/Marvel/Lego Movie) just with a new coat of paint.

Bottom Line: You have done this all before, and literally just a few months ago in the Lego Movie game. There is seldom anything redeeming here unless you are just a diehard fan that needs their LOTR fix, someone with a next gen console that needs something to play on it, or just literally have money to burn. It’s not a terribly made game; in fact, it’s rather polished, but the formula is getting stale at best. They need something, whether it be deeper combat, a new IP, harder puzzles, or bigger worlds. Aside from witty humor, this series is not going to fair well going into the next console cycle. That said, here’s hoping the next one is a return to the former wow factor they had when the Lego Star Wars games were around.

Ayodeji Asagba

Next Review: Semester Wrap Up

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References

  1. ^ Video Games (njitvector.com)
  2. ^ (njitvector.com)
  3. ^ (njitvector.com)
  4. ^ (njitvector.com)
  5. ^ (njitvector.com)
  6. ^ (njitvector.com)

hobbit lego – Google News

LEGO.com Videogames LEGO® Video Games – LEGO® The Hobbit …

Original article

DEMO Download

Demo of LEGO® Marvel Super Heroes™

Whilst traversing High Pass over The Misty Mountains, Thorin Oakenshield and his company of Dwarves accidentally set up camp on top of a secret entranceway in to Goblin Town.

The player is tasked with battling the Goblin King and then navigating the perilous gangways and boardwalks of Goblin Town in a frenzied escape!

Here you can download and play the demo. It might be a good idea to get your parents to help with this.

This demo is available for PC and needs to be installed for you to play this awesome level. The demo works for Windows (8, 7, XP, Vista) but not for MAC.

Download (550 MB)[1]

© 2014 The LEGO Group. © New Line. ™ & © SZC lic. to WBIE. (s14)

References

  1. ^ Download (550 MB) (videogames.lego.com)

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Lego The Hobbit (video game) – Wikipedia, the free …

Original article

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Lego The Hobbit is an action-adventure video game in developed by Traveller’s Tales. The game was released by Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment on 8 April 2014 in North America, and 11 April in Europe. The game is a follow-up to Lego The Lord of the Rings based on the first two Hobbit films An Unexpected Journey and The Desolation of Smaug.[1] It has a Lego feature similar to the one in The Lego Movie Videogame where Emmet has to find the instructions to build certain Lego objects except in this Videogame you have to mine for wooden objects and crystal objects to build. A PC demo version was released in March. It was released on PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, PlayStation Vita, Xbox 360, Xbox One, Wii U, Nintendo 3DS and Microsoft Windows.[2]

Gameplay

The game shows several features from the previous games, including a feature where the user should locate specific materials to build a big Lego object. When the user selects and input the correct materials a screen is displayed where the Lego machine is built and the player should select the correct pieces in exchange of studs.

Also the characters have different actions to perform, making the Dwarf Company a group with different capabilities during the mision, including someone that has archery abilities, another that uses a big hammer that can move big objects, other with the abilities to extract minerals from stones and so on. Bilbo has his abilities improved as long as the game advances, first when he gains Sting he has the ability to be a more skilled fighter and when he get the One Ring he can disappear and build invisible Lego structures.

The game, similar to the latest Lego games is composed by a big map, rather than a single hub, the player can move along different events where different characters ask users to retain a specific material from a mission or to exchange materials.

Plot

Much like its predecessors, the game presents storylines from the The Hobbit films: An Unexpected Journey and Desolation of Smaug. However, the developers modified the storylines to fit the events into a number of game chapters per film, as well as adding the humour the series has become known for.

Reception

References

  1. ^ “Lego The Hobbit Release Date Announced”. IGN. 26 February 2014. Retrieved 6 March 2014.
  2. ^ Kubba, Sinan (25 November 2013). “Lego: The Hobbit Announced”. Joystiq. Retrieved 6 March 2014.

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LEGO The Hobbit – GameSpot – Video Games Reviews & News …

Original article

LEGO The Hobbit Stone Giants – LEGO The Hobbit – Gameplay LEGO The Hobbit LEGO The Hobbit – Launch Trailer LEGO The Hobbit The Point – Ireland Loves Video Games LEGO The Hobbit LEGO The Hobbit – Buddy Up Trailer LEGO The Hobbit LEGO The Hobbit – Announcement Trailer
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The Hobbit – LEGO Part 1 – YouTube

Original article

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‘LEGO The Hobbit’ is good, yet incomplete – News10.net

Original article

Barry White, KXTV 10:31 p.m. PDT April 22, 2014

LEGO series of licensed games seems to release a new title every year. While the games are typically charming and good, its latest title LEGO The Hobbit is far from the series’ best.

Developer TT Games’ LEGO The Hobbit follows the events of the first two Peter Jackson movies — The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey and The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug. For those unfamiliar with the films or J.R.R. Tolkien’s novel The Hobbit, a hobbit named Bilbo Baggins teams up with a group of dwarves who are trying to reclaim their homeland of Erebor from a vicious dragon named Smaug. While it makes sense that the game would follow along with the immensely popular movies, the fact that the movies haven’t yet caught up with the book means that the game lacks an ending.

That’s right, this game has no true satisfactory ending.

As for gameplay in the game, it’s all about cooperative play. While co-op has been encouraged in past LEGO series games, there is even more of an emphasis on it in LEGO The Hobbit. There can be as many as eight user-controlled characters on screen at any one time, and some levels have co-op only elements. Not to say that the game can’t be played and completed as a single-player experience, but more can be done when playing in groups.

Outside of playing through the game’s main plot levels, players can re-experience them via the game’s free play mode. Any level that’s already been beaten becomes open for re-exploration with NPC quests and loot that can be captured the second, third and even sixth time around. There are even additional characters that can be unlocked as players revisit old areas. This kind of re-playability expands the game well beyond its narrow main story level setup.

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Even though the game is entertaining, it isn’t perfect. While playing on PlayStation 4 (which looks very nice, by the way), there were times when the game hung up. Once it even froze when quickly changing characters mid-level, with the only remedy being a system reboot. Also, when playing split-screen multiplayer, there were times when an action taken by one player overwhelmed the screen to the frustration of the other player.

Even with those issues, LEGO The Hobbit is fun to play. The lighthearted humor that’s been with the LEGO games since the beginning is sprinkled throughout, and the simple fun that these games provide their players is there every step of the way.

Sadly, due to its awkward ending, this adventure is simply incomplete.

Publisher: Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment
Platform(s): PlayStation 4, PlayStation 3, PlayStation Vita, Wii U, 3DS, PC, Xbox 360, and Xbox One
Rating: E10+
Release Date: April 8
Score: 3 out of 4

References

  1. ^ (www.news10.net)
  2. ^ (www.news10.net)

hobbit lego – Google News

The Monsters and the Critics

The Monsters and the Critics


The complete collection of Tolkien’s essays, including two on Beowulf, which span three decades beginning six years before The Hobbit to five years after The Lord of the Rings.
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Price: 11.81

The Origin of Our Species

The Origin of Our Species


In this ground-breaking book Chris Stringer sets out to answer all the big questions in the debate about our origins. How can we define modern humans, and how can we recognise our beginnings in the fossil and archaeological record? How can we accurately date fossils, including ones beyond the range of radiocarbon dating? What do the genetic data really tell us? Were our origins solely in Africa? Are modern humans a distinct species from ancient people such as the Neanderthals? And what contact did our ancestors have with them? How can we recognise modern humans behaviourally, and were traits such as complex language and art unique to modern humans? What forces shaped the origins of modern humans – were they climatic, dietary, social, or even volcanic? What drove the dispersals of modern humans from Africa, and how did our species spread over the globe? How did regional features evolve, and how significant are they? What exactly was the ‘Hobbit’ of the island of Flores, and how was it related to us? Has human evolution stopped, or are we still evolving? What can we expect from future research on our origins? This book will make every reader think about what it means to be human.
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The Origins of Tolkien’s Middle-earth For Dummies

The Origins of Tolkien’s Middle-earth For Dummies


J.R.R. Tolkien’s novels of Middle-earth –  The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings trilogy , and The Silmarillian  – have become some of the most famous, and most beloved, literary works of the twentieth century. And the Lord of the Rings films by director Peter Jackson have re-ignited interest in Tolkien and his works, as well as introduced his stories to a new generation of fans. Even if you’ve never read the novels and have only seen the films, you know that the world of Middle-earth is a complicated one. Tolkien took great care in representing this world, from creating new languages to including very particular cultural details that add to the richness of the world’s fabric. Many other books have been written about Tolkien and his works, but none have come close to providing the kind of reference needed to comprehend the world of Middle-earth. That’s what veteran Dummies author and unabashed Tolkien fan Greg Harvey attempts to do in The Origins of Tolkien’s Middle-earth For Dummies . As the author says in his introduction to the book, this is not an encyclopedia or quick guide to all the diverse beings, languages, and history that make up Tolkien’s Middle-earth. Nor is it a set of plot outlines for the novels. Rather, what you’ll find in The Origins of Tolkien’s Middle-earth For Dummies is a basic guide to some of the possible linguistic and mythological origins of Middle-earth, plus a rudimentary analysis of its many themes and lessons for our world. This book can help enrich your reading (or re-reading) of Tolkien’s novels, and it will challenge you to think about the themes inherent in Tolkien’s Middle-earth and their implications in your own life. Here’s just a sampling of the topics you’ll find covered in The Origins of Tolkien’s Middle-earth For Dummies : Exploring the main themes in Tolkien’s works, including immortality and death; the heroic quest; love; fate and free will; and faith and redemption Investigating the diverse lands of Middle-earth – including the Shire, Gondor, and Mordor – and their significance Examining the different cultures of Middle-earth, such as Hobbits, Elves, Men, and those wily Wizards Touring the history of Middle-earth Understanding Tolkien’s creation of new languages to enrich the story of Middle-earth Top Ten lists on the battles in the War of the Ring, online resources, and the ways the films differ from the novels So, whether you’re reading Tolkien’s novels or watching the films for the first time, or you’ve been a fan for many years and are looking for a new take on Tolkien’s works, The Origins of Tolkien’s Middle-earth For Dummies can help you enhance your reading or viewing experience for years to come.
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Price: 19.99