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The Christian World of The Hobbit

The Christian World of The Hobbit


A fantastical story rooted in the author’s faith.
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The Complete Tolkien Companion

The Complete Tolkien Companion


For all those who journey to J.R.R. Tolkien’s Middle Earth, here is the complete guide to its lands, legends, histories, languages, and people. The Tolkien Companion explains, translates, and links every single reference – names, dates, places, facts, famous weapons, even food and drink – to be found in Tolkien’s world, which includes not only The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings but also The Simarillion and many other posthumously published works. A detailed explanation of the various Elvish writing systems, together with maps, charts, and genealogical tables, bring the remarkable genius of Tolkien and the unforgettable world and wonder of Middle Earth to life with focus and accuracy. Presented in alphabetical order for quick and easy reference, this is an indispensable accompaniment for anyone who embarks on the reading journey of a lifetime. First published in 1976, this edition has been fully revised and updated for a new century of Tolkien lovers.
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Nintendo Reveals Details About New Content Hitting Wii U and 3DS eShop – Gaming Target

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The Discovery of the Hobbit

The Discovery of the Hobbit


A modern-day Raiders of the Lost Ark — the story of the discovery of an entirely new species of human.When in October 2004 the prestigious science publication Nature published the discovery of a 3-foot (1-metre) tall hominid skeleton, the world’s press went wild. Hailed as one of the most important scientific discoveries for years, the ‘Hobbit’, as the adult female came to be known, entered the history books. But until now none of the members of the original archaeological team have told their story in book form. The Discovery of the Hobbit , written by the orchestrator of the dig, describes in vivid detail what the project was aiming to achieve, what it was like to stumble across such a find, what it means for our understanding of the history of the human race and how the whole enterprise nearly collapsed under the weight of Australia’s fractious relationship with Indonesia. Featuring a bizarre island where evolution ran amok in isolation from the rest of the world and an eerie myth that may well be grounded in truth — not to mention the reasons why other ‘hobbits’ may well be alive and undiscovered elsewhere in Indonesia, this remarkable book is an adventure story and a fascinating investigation, a moving and personal narrative and a landmark celebration of scientific endeavour.
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LEGO The Hobbit – PopMatters

Original article

Thank God for the LEGO games. I’ve spent more time with Titanfall and Trials Fusion than any other games so far this year. Titanfall has been an amazing experience, multiplayer the likes of which I’ve never been able to get into, a gateway drug to multiplayer gaming in the best sense. Trials has been… well, it’s been Trials. Trials is a known quantity, a ridiculously addicting combination of platforming and motorcycle racing. Both of these experiences are intense. Both of them tax my brain and my thumbs in ways that leave me exhausted after marathon gaming sessions, whether I’ve accomplished anything tangible or not. Playing against the human opponents of Titanfall, not to mention the human developers of a Trials game, is intense to the point of stressful. Traveller’s Tales’ LEGO games are the opposite. LEGO The Hobbit came when I needed it the most, at a time when video games were becoming less about escapism and more about stressful obligation. Truth be told, LEGO The Hobbit is catching up to those other two in terms of the sheer number of hours I’ve put into it. Much like any other LEGO game, the way to play it is to get through the story as quickly as possible, and then start exploring. In the early LEGO games, the exploring was done within the levels as you looked for minikits and whatever other stray treasure might be lying around. Of late, Traveller’s Tales has expanded this approach, retaining the hidden goodies within the story levels, but also leaving all sorts of puzzles and treasures strewn about a fully-developed hub world. In the case of LEGO The Hobbit, then, “fully-developed” means “ridiculously huge”. When you’re not making your way through the goblin-fighting, dragon-fearing set pieces of the story, you’re walking all over Middle Earth, finding materials and mithril bricks with which to make new treasures, dressing up in costumes to the satisfaction of various townpeople, and solving more platforming puzzles than you ever could have hoped going in. Here are a few stats: There are 16 story levels, eight per “part” (as delimited by the movies) of The Hobbit. In each of those levels, there are ten minikits, four treasure items, and a blacksmith blueprint to find. Find all of each group of things, and you get a mithril brick (that’s a total of three per level). There is also a mithril brick reward for achieving “master burglar” status, for finding a whole mess of studs (game currency) in each level. That’s a total of 64 mithril bricks to find per level. You get another 16 just for beating the levels for a total of 80 in the story levels. There are 250 mithril bricks altogether, so a solid 170 are floating around Middle Earth, and none of them come particularly easily. Also floating around Middle Earth? 32 red “cheat” bricks, 16 more blacksmith blueprints, and a fun little diversion of a hidden level that will let you blow off some steam and get some all-important studs doing it. This is the game to play when you need a breather, when you need pure escapism, when the weight of the world is getting to be a little bit much and you just need to turn off your brain for a while. There may be puzzles throughout, but none of them are particularly difficult. The platforming should be easy for anyone who’s played a Mario game in the last 30 years. No matter how much you do, though, no matter how much you see, there’s always more, and there’s an extremely helpful map that’ll tell you exactly where to find whatever it is you need. I’ve fallen asleep playing this game a number of times, and that’s to its credit. It’s a mind-altering sort of peace you get from this game. It’s the trust of knowing that progress is around the corner, the comfort of a certain style. There are some Hobbit-specific flourishes that could delight or detract, depending on your point of view. As has been the recent trend, LEGO The Hobbit is fully voice-acted, which is nice until you find yourself listening to townsfolk whine about their problems for minutes on end, just so you know every detail of their lives before you help them find an apple or something equally banal. A frequent “punchline” is the stubble and male falsetto voices on the female dwarves, which feels vaguely transphobic in its execution. The difference between a “dwarf stack” pad and a bounce pad and a fire-starting pad is often very subtle, and while you get used to it after a while, it can be difficult to figure out exactly which characters to use where, even when you know where you need to be. For the most part, though, it’s the same LEGO game you played the last time you played a LEGO game. This is a well-trodden formula at this point, and Traveller’s Tales could be accused of spinning its wheels and running its prize franchise into the ground, turning LEGO games into its little cash cow that’ll never spawn a blockbuster but will certainly bring in solid sales numbers. It’s a game series that hasn’t changed in any fundamental way since its first installment, apart from perhaps the gradual introduction and expansion of its hub worlds. Still, there’s some comfort in knowing it’s here, that it’ll probably be around for some time. Death, taxes, and LEGO games.
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The Hobbit – Brickipedia, the LEGO Wiki

Original article

This page has been deleted. The deletion and move log for the page are provided below for reference.

There is currently no text in this page. You can search for this page title[35] in other pages, or search the related logs[36].

References

  1. ^ User:Ajraddatz (lego.wikia.com)
  2. ^ User talk:Ajraddatz (lego.wikia.com)
  3. ^ Special:Contributions/Ajraddatz (lego.wikia.com)
  4. ^ The Hobbit (page does not exist) (lego.wikia.com)
  5. ^ User:RyanBurns (lego.wikia.com)
  6. ^ User talk:RyanBurns (lego.wikia.com)
  7. ^ Special:Contributions/RyanBurns (lego.wikia.com)
  8. ^ The Hobbit (page does not exist) (lego.wikia.com)
  9. ^ Your mom (lego.wikia.com)
  10. ^ User:Yourdadsdad (lego.wikia.com)
  11. ^ User talk:Yourdadsdad (lego.wikia.com)
  12. ^ Special:Contributions/Yourdadsdad (lego.wikia.com)
  13. ^ The Hobbit (page does not exist) (lego.wikia.com)
  14. ^ User:THE ADVENTURES OF GANDALF AND SHORT PEOPLE (lego.wikia.com)
  15. ^ User:Harryhogwarts (lego.wikia.com)
  16. ^ User talk:Harryhogwarts (lego.wikia.com)
  17. ^ Special:Contributions/Harryhogwarts (lego.wikia.com)
  18. ^ The Hobbit (page does not exist) (lego.wikia.com)
  19. ^ The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey (lego.wikia.com)
  20. ^ User:Agent Swipe (lego.wikia.com)
  21. ^ User talk:Agent Swipe (lego.wikia.com)
  22. ^ Special:Contributions/Agent Swipe (lego.wikia.com)
  23. ^ The Hobbit (page does not exist) (lego.wikia.com)
  24. ^ The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey (lego.wikia.com)
  25. ^ User:NightblazeSaber (lego.wikia.com)
  26. ^ User talk:NightblazeSaber (lego.wikia.com)
  27. ^ Special:Contributions/NightblazeSaber (lego.wikia.com)
  28. ^ The Hobbit (page does not exist) (lego.wikia.com)
  29. ^ User:Gladiatoring (lego.wikia.com)
  30. ^ User talk:Gladiatoring (lego.wikia.com)
  31. ^ Special:Contributions/Gladiatoring (lego.wikia.com)
  32. ^ The Hobbit (page does not exist) (lego.wikia.com)
  33. ^ Brickipedia:Deletion policy (lego.wikia.com)
  34. ^ Traveller’s Tales (lego.wikia.com)
  35. ^ Special:Search/The Hobbit (lego.wikia.com)
  36. ^ search the related logs (lego.wikia.com)

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The Elder Edda

The Elder Edda


Part of a new series Legends from the Ancient North , The Elder Edda is one of the classic books that influenced JRR Tolkien’s The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings ‘So the company of men led a careless life, All was well with them: until One began To encompass evil, an enemy from hell. Grendel they called this cruel spirit…’ J.R.R. Tolkien spent much of his life studying, translating and teaching the great epic stories of northern Europe, filled with heroes, dragons, trolls, dwarves and magic. He was hugely influential for his advocacy of Beowulf as a great work of literature and, even if he had never written The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings , would be recognised today as a significant figure in the rediscovery of these extraordinary tales. Legends from the Ancient North brings together from Penguin Classics five of the key works behind Tolkien’s fiction.They are startling, brutal, strange pieces of writing, with an elemental power brilliantly preserved in these translations.They plunge the reader into a world of treachery, quests, chivalry, trials of strength.They are the most ancient narratives that exist from northern Europe and bring us as near as we will ever get to the origins of the magical landscape of Middle-earth (Midgard) which Tolkien remade in the 20th century.
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The Fellowship of the Ring

The Fellowship of the Ring


The first volume in J.R.R. Tolkien’s epic adventure THE LORD OF THE RINGS In ancient times the Rings of Power were crafted by the Elven-smiths, and Sauron, the Dark Lord, forged the One Ring, filling it with his own power so that he could rule all others. But the One Ring was taken from him, and though he sought it throughout Middle-earth, it remained lost to him. After many ages it fell into the hands of Bilbo Baggins, as told in THE HOBBIT. In a sleepy village in the Shire, young Frodo Baggins finds himself faced with an immense task, as his elderly cousin Bilbo entrusts the Ring to his care. Frodo must leave his home and make a perilous journey across Middle-earth to the Cracks of Doom, there to destroy the Ring and foil the Dark Lord in his evil purpose.
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The Fellowship of the Ring: The Lord of the Rings, Part 1

The Fellowship of the Ring: The Lord of the Rings, Part 1


Continuing the story begun in The Hobbit, this is the first part of Tolkien’s epic masterpiece, The Lord of the Rings, featuring the definitive text and a detailed map of Middle-earth.
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‘Lego The Hobbit’ review: A beautiful but repetitive journey through Middle-earth – Wicked Local Dennis

Original article

Having already applied the signature Lego brick-and-minifigures style to every major franchise from “Star Wars” to “Harry Potter” to “The Lord of the Rings,” “Lego The Hobbit” isn’t exactly an unexpected journey for Warner Bros. Interactive and TT Games.Nor will it be for anyone who’s familiar with the basic game play of the Lego video game series.As the third Lego title in less than a year, “Lego The Hobbit” leaves the formula pretty much unchanged from previous entries: trek around as one of numerous playable characters, many with unique attributes, and break objects to collect studs and other items.Of course, the big difference is the window dressing. In this case, Peter Jackson’s Middle-earth is often downright stunning to look at, notwithstanding some other issues that might frustrate gamers.It’s kind of strange to say this about something based on a line of toys known for its simple designs, but this is quite possibly the best Middle-earth has looked in any video game to date. Other than the blocky Lego objects themselves, which are usually breakable and scattered throughout the realistic, New Zealand-inspired landscapes, the details of Middle-earth are spot on. TT Games really captured the rich fantasy world of the movies but includes the whimsical vibe that’s made the Lego games so popular.And “Lego The Hobbit” is chock full of little treats for fans of the Jackson movies.So far, at least, this game follows just the storyline from the first two films, dividing pretty much all the events, both major and minor, into 16 playable quests.Just like in “An Unexpected Journey,”[1] gamers begin with a flashback as Thorin in the dwarfish home of Erebor before it’s taken over by the dragon Smaug. From there, things follow the movies almost beat for beat. Depending on how much one enjoyed them to begin with, this can be either a good thing or a bad thing.The same goes for the dialogue: Every line is pulled directly from the movies. For fans, having the actual voices of Martin Freeman, Ian McKellan, Andy Serkis, etc., is sure to be a welcome touch, but it also leaves the game a little tied down. The typical Lego sense of humor is still there but stuck mostly in the background this time as little visual gags while the story plays out just like it did in the movies themselves (albeit in a more truncated form).One other nice touch is the inclusion of Howard Shore’s sweeping musical score, which for some fans, is as necessary an element to anything Lord of the Rings-related as John Williams’ score is to “Star Wars.”Combined with the beautifully rendered environments and the movie-caliber voice acting, it helps give “Lego The Hobbit” a level of production value not usually seen in anything outside of astronomically budgeted triple-A titles like “Call of Duty.”Unfortunately, for all its outward charm, the game play in “Lego The Hobbit” can become kind of monotonous.The Story Mode, which can be completed in around eight hours (depending on how much one gets distracted collecting gold and silver studs), is overly scripted and linear. Glowing blue studs point exactly where to go, and although one can diverge from the path, there’s no real incentive to.In fact, since a lot of the side quests require specific characters that are only available a second time through after purchasing them, it can actually become frustrating when a gamer starts a non-story quest and gets stuck partway through a puzzle only to realize that there’s no way to solve it yet.What’s more, despite the huge number of playable characters, they’re virtually indiscernible from each other, especially the dwarves. Good luck remembering who has the flail versus the slingshot versus the spade, etc.Most of all, the game play is just extremely repetitive. One can only break so many Lego rocks and Lego trees and Lego crates of Lego fish before the charm starts to wear off.For younger gamers, a lot of this might not matter, though. In fact, the simplicity becomes a plus. The game is quite intuitive even for little kids, and the Lego style and humor take the edge off the scarier moments from the movies. Free Play and the virtually limitless amount of collectibles offer plenty of stuff to keep them busy — even if the only goal is a 100 percent completion rating — while local two-player split screen allows a friend or family member to join in on the fun.Also, it should be mentioned that, while “Lego The Hobbit” only covers the first two movies right now, extra downloadable content[2] for the third movie will be made available sometime after “The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies”[3] hits theaters in December, so if this only feels like two-thirds of a complete game when the credits roll, well … it is.Overall, despite some game play issues, “Lego The Hobbit” is a decent addition to the series that’s beautiful to look at and really captures the vibe of the movies. Fans of previous Lego games might not find anything all that innovative here, but the chance to hack it through Middle-earth again might be reason enough to invest, especially with the promise of another movie’s worth of game play in the not-too-distant future.Game: “Lego The Hobbit”Platforms: Xbox One, Xbox 360, PlayStation 4, PlayStation 3, Wii U, Nintendo 3DS, PlayStation Vita, PCPrice: $ 49.99ESRB Rating: E 10+

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