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Warner Bros. Cancels Lego: The Hobbit’s Five Armies DLC – IGN

Original article

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LEGO: The Hobbit’s storyline will remain unresolved for players.

LEGO: The Hobbit will not receive the expected downloadable expansion based on the final instalment of The Hobbit trilogy, publisher Warner Bros. confirmed, leaving its story unresolved.

“The LEGO: The Hobbit[2] video game gives LEGO and Middle-earth fans a fun, new way to experience the legendary adventures of Bilbo and company as told in the first two films of Peter Jackson’s The Hobbit trilogy,” the publisher said in a statement issued to GameSpot[3]. ”The game provides an excellent set-up for the concluding chapter of Peter Jackson’s film, The Hobbit: The Battle of Five Armies. There are no plans to develop DLC based on the final film of the trilogy.”

Launching last April before the final movie’s cinematic release, LEGO: The Hobbit follows the storylines from the first two The Hobbit films: An Unexpected Journey and Desolation of Smaug and ends on a cliffhanger.

A press release dated April 8, 2014 reveals that Warner Bros. originally planned on concluding the game’s story with DLC based on third film, then titled There and Back Again: “Additional content based on the third film, The Hobbit: There and Back Again, is planned to be available at a future release date.”

We thought the adventure game immersed in the beloved Tolkien book did a great job of baking storytelling into its gameplay by incorporating major events from the first two films[4] in bite-sized level form.

We’ve reached out to Warner Bros. for more information and will update this article accordingly.

Jenna Pitcher is a freelance journalist writing for IGN. You can follow her on Twitter[5].

IGN Logo

References

  1. ^ Jenna Pitcher (people.ign.com)
  2. ^ LEGO: The Hobbit (www.ign.com)
  3. ^ GameSpot (www.gamespot.com)
  4. ^ major events from the first two films (au.ign.com)
  5. ^ Twitter (twitter.com)

hobbit lego – Google News

Incredible Hobbit LEGO set could be in shops soon – Mirror.co.uk

Original article

LEGO fan Ben Pitchford has created this incredible Hobbit set, based on Rivendell as portrayed in the film The Hobbit: An Unexpected Gathering.[1][2]

The incredible model contains over 5,000 pieces – and you might be able to buy it in shops soon.

The LEGO Ideas page[3] allows fans to submit their own models to be made in to real sets. It’s a bit like Kickstarter, in that the most popular ideas actually get made.

Check out this incredible Hobbit model…

Ben Pitchford

The mountain is just for display (with that included it’s over 120,000 pieces!)

Ben Pitchford

Rivendell, home to the Elves with The Company of Thorin Oakenshield

Ben Pitchford

Water, created using loose clear blue round studs

Ben Pitchford

Lady Galadriel

The set includes ten buildings with a main bridge to a platform

Ben Pitchford

The platform

Ben Pitchford

The bridge

Ben Pitchford

Is this the secret entrance to Erebor?

It has all the figures you’ll recognise, from Gandalf and Bilbo to Thorin Oakenshield and Lady Galadriel.

Ben Pitchford

There’s even a few guard elves

Ben Pitchford

But can they read the map?

The mountain separates into three parts

Ben Pitchford

You need a pretty big house to store this… luckily only the buildings and characters would come in the set

The set even has light up sections

Ben Pitchford

Light up moon runes show the way to the secret entrance to Erebor

Ben Pitchford

It possibly looks cooler at night

If you want to support Ben’s creation[4] and see it made into a reality, check out his LEGO ideas page.[5] The set needs 10,000 supporters to become a reality.

MORE: Pompeii made from LEGO- stunning 190,000 brick masterpiece[6]

The model is actually a scaled down version of a model created by Ben and his son (which contains over 120,000 pieces!) which is now on display at a children’s museum in the US.

You can see more of that model in this clip.

LEGO Rivendell Video loading[7]

[embedded content]

 

References

  1. ^ LEGO (www.mirror.co.uk)
  2. ^ The Hobbit: An Unexpected Gathering. (www.mirror.co.uk)
  3. ^ The LEGO Ideas page (www.mirror.co.uk)
  4. ^ support Ben’s creation (www.mocpages.com)
  5. ^ his LEGO ideas page. (ideas.lego.com)
  6. ^ Pompeii made from LEGO- stunning 190,000 brick masterpiece (www.mirror.co.uk)
  7. ^ LEGO Rivendell (www.mirror.co.uk)

hobbitlego – Google News

Alfred Hobbit Unexpected Journey Big Note Piano Book

Alfred Hobbit Unexpected Journey Big Note Piano Book


With this collection, pianists in their early years of study can enjoy playing simplified arrangements of eight elections from Howard Shore’s brilliant score to The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey. Shore masterfully expands upon the musical palette of Middle-earth, blending familiar motifs from the The Lord of the Rings trilogy with an exciting array of memorable new themes. In addition to the piano arrangements, this beautifully produced souvenir folio features an array of colorful photos from the film. Titles: An Unexpected Party * Misty Mountains * The Adventure Begins * Song of the Lonely Mountain * Dreaming of Bag End * A Very Respectable Hobbit * Erebor * The Dwarf Lords. Category: Piano – Big Note CollectionFormat: BookInstrument: PianoLevel: Big NoteVersion: Big Note Piano
List Price:
Price: 14.99

Is James Nesbitt ‘the drinking woman’s George Clooney’? – Sydney Morning Herald

Original article

Man in the mirror: James Nesbitt makes a pointed remark.

Man in the mirror: James Nesbitt makes a pointed remark. Photo: trunkarchive.com/Snapper Media

It’s 11.45am,and the jet-lagged Northern Irish actor James Nesbitt – Adam from Cold Feet; Bofur from The Hobbit – is sipping a fat pint of Guinness in the time-worn Fortune of War pub in The Rocks in Sydney. We started talking at the more salubrious Shangri-La Hotel, before alarming Nesbitt’s publicist with the announcement we were going out for a “sandwich”.

They do not, however, serve sandwiches at the Fortune of War.

The night before, I was watching last year’s UK drama series The Missing (released on DVD in February) in which Nesbitt stars as Tony Hughes, the desperate and obsessed father of a five-year-old boy who goes missing in France. If there were a drinking game based around taking a sip each time Tony drains a glass, every player would end up dead. So it seems fitting that Nesbitt and I should go for a beer – although not, perhaps, to the publicist.

Nesbitt is a 50-year-old man with a 15-year-old’s grin. He once described himself – with ever-present self-mockery – as “the drinking woman’s George Clooney”. While any woman who mistook Nesbitt for Clooney would have to be abusing stronger drugs than alcohol, he is character-actor handsome, with a seductive Irish brogue.

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He is also relentlessly candid, which is unusual for actors, who tend to spend their working days posing as people more interesting than themselves, and their media appointments pretending to have no personality at all. But Nesbitt largely interviews himself. Luckily, he is a fairly severe auto-interrogator and, if he feels he has not responded with sufficient rigour to something I didn’t ask him in the first place, he will gently but firmly harass himself until the facts are out in the open.

Nesbitt was born to a Protestant family in Ballymena, County Antrim, in January 1965, and grew up in the village of Broughshane. His father – “an extraordinary teacher” – was headmaster of the tiny local primary school and Nesbitt had three older sisters. “You grow up respecting and loving women,” he says, “but you also probably spend a lifetime trying to replicate that love your sisters give you, and your mother gives the only boy.”

The family moved to Coleraine, north-west of Belfast, where he was enrolled in a grammar school. “At school, I fitted in most of the things,” he says. “I was a prefect, yet I was a bollix [jackass]. I wasn’t bullied, but I was hated and loved by the bully guys. I was sporty yet musical. Teachers were very frustrated by me. We used to get hit at school: I used to f…ing love it, because I could handle it. And the best way to get hit by a teacher was not to be annoyed by it.

“What I quite liked about going to a boys’ school in Northern Ireland was not only were girls automatically more interesting because you were segregated from them, but because of the whole Protestant-Catholic thing, I was always into Catholic girls, because that was really taboo. The convent girls, I f…ing loved – particularly on a Friday night before they confessed on a Saturday. That’s when you’d get more action out of them, because then they knew they could redeem themselves the following morning.

“I was of that generation that didn’t want to acknowledge the Troubles. I quite enjoyed it, in a way – the segregation, the secrecy, the taboo, the convent girls – because it wasn’t having an immediate, obvious impact on my life and my family and friends.”

He grew up thinking he might become a teacher like his father and sisters. But when he was 14, he says, his dad dragged him off the rugby pitch and took him to the theatre. He auditioned for a production of Oliver and won the role of the Artful Dodger.

“And only now, 35 years on, can I truly say: the minute I put on the old Dodger’s long coat and walked on stage – I’m probably articulating this for the first time – I f…ing felt awesome.”

He allows the weight of his confession to sink in to himself. “I find it almost quite moving,” he says. “You can’t be a Northern Irish Protestant and go into acting. It’s absurd. It’s not a real job. It doesn’t have any worth.”

Nesbitt met his wife, actor Sonia Forbes-Adam, in 1989. They were both performing in Hamlet, on an international tour with a Russian director. They married in 1994, had two daughters, and separated in 2013. Nesbitt has said he won’t talk about the end of their relationship, or the various rumours of his infidelities, so he only addresses these subjects sparingly, when he – as his own interviewer – feels they are vital to the story.

This is the point when we adjourn to the pub.

Over Guinness, he tells me about his time on the TV comedy-drama Cold Feet from 1998 to 2003. “Ten million people were watching,” he says, “and, as much as at the time I would’ve said, ‘Oh yeah, I’m great with all this, I’m the people’s champion, I can get on with everyone,’ it’s confusing, that world. It has an impact on you. It probably damaged my family quite a bit – that’s really where the duality of my life was forming. On one hand, here I am, the family man, providing, doing all the things I was supposed to do, being the son that my mother would’ve wanted me to be. Yet there was this secret: the fame, the excess, the disconnection. The split was really happening.

“I partied too much and I got a bit lost. I regret stuff like that. I also now take ownership of things. I can go, ‘You know what? It doesn’t make me a terrible person.’ I mean it’s a bit of shame but, f… it, the sun’s going to get up tomorrow, so I might as well.”

But Nesbitt’s heart was in films. In 2002, Nesbitt played the lead in the TV movie Bloody Sunday, about the British Army’s massacre of unarmed civil-rights demonstrators in Northern Ireland in 1972. Nesbitt’s character, the Protestant MP Ivan Cooper, leads his largely Catholic constituents on a march through Derry – for some, to their deaths. Nesbitt’s Cooper is courageous yet nervous, unflinching yet conflicted, empowered by the strength of his righteous cause, yet ultimately impotent.

Nesbitt met with Cooper before production, finding him tormented with guilt at having encouraged the march. He asked Cooper to retrace the route with him. “It was a kind of exorcism,” says Nesbitt.

Cooper told Nesbitt of his horror upon viewing the bodies of the dead in the hospital, young men who had become nothing more than “slabs of meat”.

Nesbitt’s voice cracks. “I find it really hard to talk about actually,” he says – which is strange, since he asked himself about it in the first place.

Bloody Sunday marked “the first time I really began to look at where I came from”, he says, “what had happened to the country I was so proud of.”

In 2009, he made the TV movie Five Minutes of Heaven, about the possibilities of individual reconciliation in Northern Ireland. He had become involved in WAVE, a charity for people traumatised by the Troubles, and is increasingly drawn to politics.

“I want to cut a swathe through f…ing politics in Northern Ireland,” he says. He believes the former gunmen have a responsibility to help heal society. “I get angry that they are seen as peacemakers all the time now, when actually they were cowardly murderers at times.”

In 2011, now an established, admired and awarded serious actor, Nesbitt travelled to New Zealand to begin to film Peter Jackson’s Hobbit trilogy. “You don’t go into The Hobbit for the acting thing,” he says. “You go for the experience, and that was sensational.”

He says it was wonderful to have his daughters with him, in a strange and beautiful country. It was a good time with Sonia, too, “funnily enough”.

“We separated after,” he says, “but we had one of the best years of our marriage, in a sense, out there.”

His mother died in 2012, lost to Alzheimer’s. Although their relationship was always close,

“I wish I could have another crack at it sometimes,” he says, “because I miss her so terribly.”

Last year, when he made The Missing, Nesbitt tried to harness his love of his family to understand Tony Hughes’ agony at losing his child. “Because I’ve done that in the past,” he says. “I’ll exploit my children. I’ll use the way I might feel if something happened to them. I’ll use the loss of my mother sometimes. But in rehearsal I discovered that if you try to imagine that happening to your own children, there’s an instinctive self-defence mechanism within you that disallows it. So it transpired that I was going to have to do my job.”

Nesbitt immersed himself in Tony. “It helped that I was filming in Brussels,” he says, “so I was automatically disconnected from my girls – also I separated halfway through it, so I was able to find that disconnect; it was an isolated world anyway. I got an apartment. I turned it into Tony’s den. In the evenings, very much like Tony, I would trawl the streets of Brussels with a fag. I’d drink too much, I’d deliberately get myself into bad places.”

We’ve been in the pub longer than we’d promised and Nesbitt is fielding anxious text messages from his publicist. We have to leave, because life is short, but Nesbitt has found his own route to immortality.

“There were only ever 13 dwarfs [in The Hobbit],” he says, “and I was one. I’ve got a little Lego piece of my character: I wear a funny hat in The Hobbit and my Lego head is recyclable. So, long after I’m gone, all over the word, that little tiny Bofur Hobbit Lego piece will be lodged up the noses of three-year-olds.” 

hobbitlego – Google News

Warner Bros. Axes Lego: The Hobbit’s Five Armies DLC – Arcade Sushi

Original article

Warning: this article brings bad news to Shire folk — Warner Bros has announced Lego The Hobbit[1] will not be getting any kind of DLC based on the third movie, The Battle of the Five Armies.

When we reported on the new Lego Avengers[2] and Lego Jurassic World[3] games being announced, it seemed that a few Lego fans were a bit miffed. Why make new games when you haven’t even finished Lego The Hobbit, they wondered? Well, now we know that the reason is simply that Lego The Hobbit is as finished as it will ever be.

The publisher then went on to confirm that there are no plans for a future new game based on the film either. Womp, womp. Despite a DLC based on the third movie seeming imminent in April when a Warner Bros. spokesperson told fans to, “stay tuned for more exciting news in the near future,” there will not be a DLC coming out for its fans.

Since the game debuted in April of last year, fans have been absolutely bombarding Warner Bros. with questions about sequels to the game or an expansion that would encompass the third movie. You can check out Warner Bros’ official statement below (courtesy of Gamespot[4]), but spoiler alert: it’s mostly just talking up the current game in an effort to make fans forget about the little tiny detail of them leaving an entire movie and ending out of the game — your standard PR misdirections.

“The LEGO The Hobbit video game gives LEGO and Middle-earth fans a fun, new way to experience the legendary adventures of Bilbo and company as told in the first two films of Peter Jackson’s The Hobbit trilogy. The game provides an excellent set-up for the concluding chapter of Peter Jackson’s film, The Hobbit: The Battle of Five Armies. There are no plans to develop DLC based on the final film of the trilogy.”

References

  1. ^ Lego The Hobbit (arcadesushi.com)
  2. ^ Lego Avengers (arcadesushi.com)
  3. ^ Lego Jurassic World (arcadesushi.com)
  4. ^ Gamespot (www.gamespot.com)

hobbit lego – Google News

Is James Nesbitt ‘the drinking woman’s George Clooney’? – Sydney Morning Herald

Original article

Man in the mirror: James Nesbitt makes a pointed remark.

Man in the mirror: James Nesbitt makes a pointed remark. Photo: trunkarchive.com/Snapper Media

It’s 11.45am,and the jet-lagged Northern Irish actor James Nesbitt – Adam from Cold Feet; Bofur from The Hobbit – is sipping a fat pint of Guinness in the time-worn Fortune of War pub in The Rocks in Sydney. We started talking at the more salubrious Shangri-La Hotel, before alarming Nesbitt’s publicist with the announcement we were going out for a “sandwich”.

They do not, however, serve sandwiches at the Fortune of War.

The night before, I was watching last year’s UK drama series The Missing (released on DVD in February) in which Nesbitt stars as Tony Hughes, the desperate and obsessed father of a five-year-old boy who goes missing in France. If there were a drinking game based around taking a sip each time Tony drains a glass, every player would end up dead. So it seems fitting that Nesbitt and I should go for a beer – although not, perhaps, to the publicist.

Nesbitt is a 50-year-old man with a 15-year-old’s grin. He once described himself – with ever-present self-mockery – as “the drinking woman’s George Clooney”. While any woman who mistook Nesbitt for Clooney would have to be abusing stronger drugs than alcohol, he is character-actor handsome, with a seductive Irish brogue.

Advertisement

He is also relentlessly candid, which is unusual for actors, who tend to spend their working days posing as people more interesting than themselves, and their media appointments pretending to have no personality at all. But Nesbitt largely interviews himself. Luckily, he is a fairly severe auto-interrogator and, if he feels he has not responded with sufficient rigour to something I didn’t ask him in the first place, he will gently but firmly harass himself until the facts are out in the open.

Nesbitt was born to a Protestant family in Ballymena, County Antrim, in January 1965, and grew up in the village of Broughshane. His father – “an extraordinary teacher” – was headmaster of the tiny local primary school and Nesbitt had three older sisters. “You grow up respecting and loving women,” he says, “but you also probably spend a lifetime trying to replicate that love your sisters give you, and your mother gives the only boy.”

The family moved to Coleraine, north-west of Belfast, where he was enrolled in a grammar school. “At school, I fitted in most of the things,” he says. “I was a prefect, yet I was a bollix [jackass]. I wasn’t bullied, but I was hated and loved by the bully guys. I was sporty yet musical. Teachers were very frustrated by me. We used to get hit at school: I used to f…ing love it, because I could handle it. And the best way to get hit by a teacher was not to be annoyed by it.

“What I quite liked about going to a boys’ school in Northern Ireland was not only were girls automatically more interesting because you were segregated from them, but because of the whole Protestant-Catholic thing, I was always into Catholic girls, because that was really taboo. The convent girls, I f…ing loved – particularly on a Friday night before they confessed on a Saturday. That’s when you’d get more action out of them, because then they knew they could redeem themselves the following morning.

“I was of that generation that didn’t want to acknowledge the Troubles. I quite enjoyed it, in a way – the segregation, the secrecy, the taboo, the convent girls – because it wasn’t having an immediate, obvious impact on my life and my family and friends.”

He grew up thinking he might become a teacher like his father and sisters. But when he was 14, he says, his dad dragged him off the rugby pitch and took him to the theatre. He auditioned for a production of Oliver and won the role of the Artful Dodger.

“And only now, 35 years on, can I truly say: the minute I put on the old Dodger’s long coat and walked on stage – I’m probably articulating this for the first time – I f…ing felt awesome.”

He allows the weight of his confession to sink in to himself. “I find it almost quite moving,” he says. “You can’t be a Northern Irish Protestant and go into acting. It’s absurd. It’s not a real job. It doesn’t have any worth.”

Nesbitt met his wife, actor Sonia Forbes-Adam, in 1989. They were both performing in Hamlet, on an international tour with a Russian director. They married in 1994, had two daughters, and separated in 2013. Nesbitt has said he won’t talk about the end of their relationship, or the various rumours of his infidelities, so he only addresses these subjects sparingly, when he – as his own interviewer – feels they are vital to the story.

This is the point when we adjourn to the pub.

Over Guinness, he tells me about his time on the TV comedy-drama Cold Feet from 1998 to 2003. “Ten million people were watching,” he says, “and, as much as at the time I would’ve said, ‘Oh yeah, I’m great with all this, I’m the people’s champion, I can get on with everyone,’ it’s confusing, that world. It has an impact on you. It probably damaged my family quite a bit – that’s really where the duality of my life was forming. On one hand, here I am, the family man, providing, doing all the things I was supposed to do, being the son that my mother would’ve wanted me to be. Yet there was this secret: the fame, the excess, the disconnection. The split was really happening.

“I partied too much and I got a bit lost. I regret stuff like that. I also now take ownership of things. I can go, ‘You know what? It doesn’t make me a terrible person.’ I mean it’s a bit of shame but, f… it, the sun’s going to get up tomorrow, so I might as well.”

But Nesbitt’s heart was in films. In 2002, Nesbitt played the lead in the TV movie Bloody Sunday, about the British Army’s massacre of unarmed civil-rights demonstrators in Northern Ireland in 1972. Nesbitt’s character, the Protestant MP Ivan Cooper, leads his largely Catholic constituents on a march through Derry – for some, to their deaths. Nesbitt’s Cooper is courageous yet nervous, unflinching yet conflicted, empowered by the strength of his righteous cause, yet ultimately impotent.

Nesbitt met with Cooper before production, finding him tormented with guilt at having encouraged the march. He asked Cooper to retrace the route with him. “It was a kind of exorcism,” says Nesbitt.

Cooper told Nesbitt of his horror upon viewing the bodies of the dead in the hospital, young men who had become nothing more than “slabs of meat”.

Nesbitt’s voice cracks. “I find it really hard to talk about actually,” he says – which is strange, since he asked himself about it in the first place.

Bloody Sunday marked “the first time I really began to look at where I came from”, he says, “what had happened to the country I was so proud of.”

In 2009, he made the TV movie Five Minutes of Heaven, about the possibilities of individual reconciliation in Northern Ireland. He had become involved in WAVE, a charity for people traumatised by the Troubles, and is increasingly drawn to politics.

“I want to cut a swathe through f…ing politics in Northern Ireland,” he says. He believes the former gunmen have a responsibility to help heal society. “I get angry that they are seen as peacemakers all the time now, when actually they were cowardly murderers at times.”

In 2011, now an established, admired and awarded serious actor, Nesbitt travelled to New Zealand to begin to film Peter Jackson’s Hobbit trilogy. “You don’t go into The Hobbit for the acting thing,” he says. “You go for the experience, and that was sensational.”

He says it was wonderful to have his daughters with him, in a strange and beautiful country. It was a good time with Sonia, too, “funnily enough”.

“We separated after,” he says, “but we had one of the best years of our marriage, in a sense, out there.”

His mother died in 2012, lost to Alzheimer’s. Although their relationship was always close,

“I wish I could have another crack at it sometimes,” he says, “because I miss her so terribly.”

Last year, when he made The Missing, Nesbitt tried to harness his love of his family to understand Tony Hughes’ agony at losing his child. “Because I’ve done that in the past,” he says. “I’ll exploit my children. I’ll use the way I might feel if something happened to them. I’ll use the loss of my mother sometimes. But in rehearsal I discovered that if you try to imagine that happening to your own children, there’s an instinctive self-defence mechanism within you that disallows it. So it transpired that I was going to have to do my job.”

Nesbitt immersed himself in Tony. “It helped that I was filming in Brussels,” he says, “so I was automatically disconnected from my girls – also I separated halfway through it, so I was able to find that disconnect; it was an isolated world anyway. I got an apartment. I turned it into Tony’s den. In the evenings, very much like Tony, I would trawl the streets of Brussels with a fag. I’d drink too much, I’d deliberately get myself into bad places.”

We’ve been in the pub longer than we’d promised and Nesbitt is fielding anxious text messages from his publicist. We have to leave, because life is short, but Nesbitt has found his own route to immortality.

“There were only ever 13 dwarfs [in The Hobbit],” he says, “and I was one. I’ve got a little Lego piece of my character: I wear a funny hat in The Hobbit and my Lego head is recyclable. So, long after I’m gone, all over the word, that little tiny Bofur Hobbit Lego piece will be lodged up the noses of three-year-olds.” 

hobbitlego – Google News

Warner Bros. Axes Lego: The Hobbit’s Five Armies DLC – Arcade Sushi

Original article

Warning: this article brings bad news to Shire folk — Warner Bros has announced Lego The Hobbit[1] will not be getting any kind of DLC based on the third movie, The Battle of the Five Armies.

When we reported on the new Lego Avengers[2] and Lego Jurassic World[3] games being announced, it seemed that a few Lego fans were a bit miffed. Why make new games when you haven’t even finished Lego The Hobbit, they wondered? Well, now we know that the reason is simply that Lego The Hobbit is as finished as it will ever be.

The publisher then went on to confirm that there are no plans for a future new game based on the film either. Womp, womp. Despite a DLC based on the third movie seeming imminent in April when a Warner Bros. spokesperson told fans to, “stay tuned for more exciting news in the near future,” there will not be a DLC coming out for its fans.

Since the game debuted in April of last year, fans have been absolutely bombarding Warner Bros. with questions about sequels to the game or an expansion that would encompass the third movie. You can check out Warner Bros’ official statement below (courtesy of Gamespot[4]), but spoiler alert: it’s mostly just talking up the current game in an effort to make fans forget about the little tiny detail of them leaving an entire movie and ending out of the game — your standard PR misdirections.

“The LEGO The Hobbit video game gives LEGO and Middle-earth fans a fun, new way to experience the legendary adventures of Bilbo and company as told in the first two films of Peter Jackson’s The Hobbit trilogy. The game provides an excellent set-up for the concluding chapter of Peter Jackson’s film, The Hobbit: The Battle of Five Armies. There are no plans to develop DLC based on the final film of the trilogy.”

References

  1. ^ Lego The Hobbit (arcadesushi.com)
  2. ^ Lego Avengers (arcadesushi.com)
  3. ^ Lego Jurassic World (arcadesushi.com)
  4. ^ Gamespot (www.gamespot.com)

hobbit lego – Google News

Is James Nesbitt ‘the drinking woman’s George Clooney’? – The Age

Original article

Man in the mirror: James Nesbitt makes a pointed remark.

Man in the mirror: James Nesbitt makes a pointed remark. Photo: trunkarchive.com/Snapper Media

It’s 11.45am,and the jet-lagged Northern Irish actor James Nesbitt – Adam from Cold Feet; Bofur from The Hobbit – is sipping a fat pint of Guinness in the time-worn Fortune of War pub in The Rocks in Sydney. We started talking at the more salubrious Shangri-La Hotel, before alarming Nesbitt’s publicist with the announcement we were going out for a “sandwich”.

They do not, however, serve sandwiches at the Fortune of War.

The night before, I was watching last year’s UK drama series The Missing (released on DVD in February) in which Nesbitt stars as Tony Hughes, the desperate and obsessed father of a five-year-old boy who goes missing in France. If there were a drinking game based around taking a sip each time Tony drains a glass, every player would end up dead. So it seems fitting that Nesbitt and I should go for a beer – although not, perhaps, to the publicist.

Nesbitt is a 50-year-old man with a 15-year-old’s grin. He once described himself – with ever-present self-mockery – as “the drinking woman’s George Clooney”. While any woman who mistook Nesbitt for Clooney would have to be abusing stronger drugs than alcohol, he is character-actor handsome, with a seductive Irish brogue.

He is also relentlessly candid, which is unusual for actors, who tend to spend their working days posing as people more interesting than themselves, and their media appointments pretending to have no personality at all. But Nesbitt largely interviews himself. Luckily, he is a fairly severe auto-interrogator and, if he feels he has not responded with sufficient rigour to something I didn’t ask him in the first place, he will gently but firmly harass himself until the facts are out in the open.

Nesbitt was born to a Protestant family in Ballymena, County Antrim, in January 1965, and grew up in the village of Broughshane. His father – “an extraordinary teacher” – was headmaster of the tiny local primary school and Nesbitt had three older sisters. “You grow up respecting and loving women,” he says, “but you also probably spend a lifetime trying to replicate that love your sisters give you, and your mother gives the only boy.”

The family moved to Coleraine, north-west of Belfast, where he was enrolled in a grammar school. “At school, I fitted in most of the things,” he says. “I was a prefect, yet I was a bollix [jackass]. I wasn’t bullied, but I was hated and loved by the bully guys. I was sporty yet musical. Teachers were very frustrated by me. We used to get hit at school: I used to f…ing love it, because I could handle it. And the best way to get hit by a teacher was not to be annoyed by it.

“What I quite liked about going to a boys’ school in Northern Ireland was not only were girls automatically more interesting because you were segregated from them, but because of the whole Protestant-Catholic thing, I was always into Catholic girls, because that was really taboo. The convent girls, I f…ing loved – particularly on a Friday night before they confessed on a Saturday. That’s when you’d get more action out of them, because then they knew they could redeem themselves the following morning.

“I was of that generation that didn’t want to acknowledge the Troubles. I quite enjoyed it, in a way – the segregation, the secrecy, the taboo, the convent girls – because it wasn’t having an immediate, obvious impact on my life and my family and friends.”

He grew up thinking he might become a teacher like his father and sisters. But when he was 14, he says, his dad dragged him off the rugby pitch and took him to the theatre. He auditioned for a production of Oliver and won the role of the Artful Dodger.

“And only now, 35 years on, can I truly say: the minute I put on the old Dodger’s long coat and walked on stage – I’m probably articulating this for the first time – I f…ing felt awesome.”

He allows the weight of his confession to sink in to himself. “I find it almost quite moving,” he says. “You can’t be a Northern Irish Protestant and go into acting. It’s absurd. It’s not a real job. It doesn’t have any worth.”

Nesbitt met his wife, actor Sonia Forbes-Adam, in 1989. They were both performing in Hamlet, on an international tour with a Russian director. They married in 1994, had two daughters, and separated in 2013. Nesbitt has said he won’t talk about the end of their relationship, or the various rumours of his infidelities, so he only addresses these subjects sparingly, when he – as his own interviewer – feels they are vital to the story.

This is the point when we adjourn to the pub.

Over Guinness, he tells me about his time on the TV comedy-drama Cold Feet from 1998 to 2003. “Ten million people were watching,” he says, “and, as much as at the time I would’ve said, ‘Oh yeah, I’m great with all this, I’m the people’s champion, I can get on with everyone,’ it’s confusing, that world. It has an impact on you. It probably damaged my family quite a bit – that’s really where the duality of my life was forming. On one hand, here I am, the family man, providing, doing all the things I was supposed to do, being the son that my mother would’ve wanted me to be. Yet there was this secret: the fame, the excess, the disconnection. The split was really happening.

“I partied too much and I got a bit lost. I regret stuff like that. I also now take ownership of things. I can go, ‘You know what? It doesn’t make me a terrible person.’ I mean it’s a bit of shame but, f… it, the sun’s going to get up tomorrow, so I might as well.”

But Nesbitt’s heart was in films. In 2002, Nesbitt played the lead in the TV movie Bloody Sunday, about the British Army’s massacre of unarmed civil-rights demonstrators in Northern Ireland in 1972. Nesbitt’s character, the Protestant MP Ivan Cooper, leads his largely Catholic constituents on a march through Derry – for some, to their deaths. Nesbitt’s Cooper is courageous yet nervous, unflinching yet conflicted, empowered by the strength of his righteous cause, yet ultimately impotent.

Nesbitt met with Cooper before production, finding him tormented with guilt at having encouraged the march. He asked Cooper to retrace the route with him. “It was a kind of exorcism,” says Nesbitt.

Cooper told Nesbitt of his horror upon viewing the bodies of the dead in the hospital, young men who had become nothing more than “slabs of meat”.

Nesbitt’s voice cracks. “I find it really hard to talk about actually,” he says – which is strange, since he asked himself about it in the first place.

Bloody Sunday marked “the first time I really began to look at where I came from”, he says, “what had happened to the country I was so proud of.”

In 2009, he made the TV movie Five Minutes of Heaven, about the possibilities of individual reconciliation in Northern Ireland. He had become involved in WAVE, a charity for people traumatised by the Troubles, and is increasingly drawn to politics.

“I want to cut a swathe through f…ing politics in Northern Ireland,” he says. He believes the former gunmen have a responsibility to help heal society. “I get angry that they are seen as peacemakers all the time now, when actually they were cowardly murderers at times.”

In 2011, now an established, admired and awarded serious actor, Nesbitt travelled to New Zealand to begin to film Peter Jackson’s Hobbit trilogy. “You don’t go into The Hobbit for the acting thing,” he says. “You go for the experience, and that was sensational.”

He says it was wonderful to have his daughters with him, in a strange and beautiful country. It was a good time with Sonia, too, “funnily enough”.

“We separated after,” he says, “but we had one of the best years of our marriage, in a sense, out there.”

His mother died in 2012, lost to Alzheimer’s. Although their relationship was always close,

“I wish I could have another crack at it sometimes,” he says, “because I miss her so terribly.”

Last year, when he made The Missing, Nesbitt tried to harness his love of his family to understand Tony Hughes’ agony at losing his child. “Because I’ve done that in the past,” he says. “I’ll exploit my children. I’ll use the way I might feel if something happened to them. I’ll use the loss of my mother sometimes. But in rehearsal I discovered that if you try to imagine that happening to your own children, there’s an instinctive self-defence mechanism within you that disallows it. So it transpired that I was going to have to do my job.”

Nesbitt immersed himself in Tony. “It helped that I was filming in Brussels,” he says, “so I was automatically disconnected from my girls – also I separated halfway through it, so I was able to find that disconnect; it was an isolated world anyway. I got an apartment. I turned it into Tony’s den. In the evenings, very much like Tony, I would trawl the streets of Brussels with a fag. I’d drink too much, I’d deliberately get myself into bad places.”

We’ve been in the pub longer than we’d promised and Nesbitt is fielding anxious text messages from his publicist. We have to leave, because life is short, but Nesbitt has found his own route to immortality.

“There were only ever 13 dwarfs [in The Hobbit],” he says, “and I was one. I’ve got a little Lego piece of my character: I wear a funny hat in The Hobbit and my Lego head is recyclable. So, long after I’m gone, all over the word, that little tiny Bofur Hobbit Lego piece will be lodged up the noses of three-year-olds.” 

hobbitlego – Google News

Incredible Hobbit LEGO set could be in shops soon – Mirror.co.uk

Original article

LEGO fan Ben Pitchford has created this incredible Hobbit set, based on Rivendell as portrayed in the film The Hobbit: An Unexpected Gathering.[1][2]

The incredible model contains over 5,000 pieces – and you might be able to buy it in shops soon.

The LEGO Ideas page[3] allows fans to submit their own models to be made in to real sets. It’s a bit like Kickstarter, in that the most popular ideas actually get made.

Check out this incredible Hobbit model…

Ben Pitchford

The mountain is just for display (with that included it’s over 120,000 pieces!)

Ben Pitchford

Rivendell, home to the Elves with The Company of Thorin Oakenshield

Ben Pitchford

Water, created using loose clear blue round studs

Ben Pitchford

Lady Galadriel

The set includes ten buildings with a main bridge to a platform

Ben Pitchford

The platform

Ben Pitchford

The bridge

Ben Pitchford

Is this the secret entrance to Erebor?

It has all the figures you’ll recognise, from Gandalf and Bilbo to Thorin Oakenshield and Lady Galadriel.

Ben Pitchford

There’s even a few guard elves

Ben Pitchford

But can they read the map?

The mountain separates into three parts

Ben Pitchford

You need a pretty big house to store this… luckily only the buildings and characters would come in the set

The set even has light up sections

Ben Pitchford

Light up moon runes show the way to the secret entrance to Erebor

Ben Pitchford

It possibly looks cooler at night

If you want to support Ben’s creation[4] and see it made into a reality, check out his LEGO ideas page.[5] The set needs 10,000 supporters to become a reality.

MORE: Pompeii made from LEGO- stunning 190,000 brick masterpiece[6]

The model is actually a scaled down version of a model created by Ben and his son (which contains over 120,000 pieces!) which is now on display at a children’s museum in the US.

You can see more of that model in this clip.

LEGO Rivendell Video loading[7]

[embedded content]

 

References

  1. ^ LEGO (www.mirror.co.uk)
  2. ^ The Hobbit: An Unexpected Gathering. (www.mirror.co.uk)
  3. ^ The LEGO Ideas page (www.mirror.co.uk)
  4. ^ support Ben’s creation (www.mocpages.com)
  5. ^ his LEGO ideas page. (ideas.lego.com)
  6. ^ Pompeii made from LEGO- stunning 190,000 brick masterpiece (www.mirror.co.uk)
  7. ^ LEGO Rivendell (www.mirror.co.uk)

hobbitlego – Google News

Alfred 2015 Greatest Pop & Movie Hits Easy Piano Book

Alfred 2015 Greatest Pop & Movie Hits Easy Piano Book


The year’s greatest pop hits and movie songs are included in this collection of easy piano arrangements by Dan Coates. Lyrics and chord symbols are also included so anyone can sing or play along. Titles: 19 You + Me (Dan + Shay) * Ain’t It Fun (Paramore) * All About That Bass (Meghan Trainor) * Alone Yet Not Alone (from Alone Yet Not Alone) * Believer (American Authors) * Best Day of My Life (American Authors) * Beyond the Forest (from The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug) * Bleed for Love (from Winnie Mandela) * Can You Hear Your Heart? (from Winter’s Tale) * Clouds (Zach Sobiech) * Coming Up Roses (from Begin Again) * Compass (from Heaven Is For Real) * Cool Kids (Echosmith) * Doin’ What She Likes (Blake Shelton) * Everything I Didn’t Say (5 Seconds of Summer) * Everything Is Awesome (from The Lego Movie) * Gravity (from Gravity) * Heart by Heart (from The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones) * I See Fire (from The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug) * Roar (Katy Perry) * Unfinished Songs (Celine Dion) * Up All Night (Jon Pardi).Deluxe Annual Edition * The Biggest Movies * The Greatest Artists
List Price: 14.99
Price: 14.99